Wednesday, January 31, 2018

visible mending


Do you mend your clothes? I must admit, I used to see clothes mending as something only poor people had to do because they couldn't afford new clothes. I know, pretty bad attitude for sure, especially since this kind of thinking adds to all the unnecessary waste we produce.

Thankfully though over the last few months I started seeing mending as something not just useful and good for the environment, but also a way to make one's wardrobe more fun and unique. Have you heard of visible mending? I found it super, super inspiring and decided to try it out on a pair of older jeans I was ready to retire :)


I love the way my newly mended jeans look and have been wearing them a lot. I even got some comments from my daughter's friends on how cool my jeans are :)


In case you wonder how I did my mending, here's a quick description. I cut a piece of thin denim and turned the raw edges in to form a patch. I pinned the patch through one layer of jeans and went ahead to attach it using sashiko thread and a simple running stitch. No marking or any serious measuring was needed,  I just eyeballed it all and kept stitching until the whole patch was secured.

Pretty simple, right? I can't wait to start on my next pair of jeans soon.

So tell me. Do you mend your clothes? Any techniques you'd recommend? or articles? I'd love to know.

Hope you have a happy and creative day friends. Svetlana


15 comments:

  1. I love this and thank you for the instructions. I think that would be a great way to do elbow patches too and I have something right now that needs mending. That's one of the great things about blogging . . . don't you find that there is always someone out there that is doing a project that you have been thinking about? When they are as sweet as you and show us how they did it, that is the best!
    Thank you again.
    Connie :)

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  2. My 5-year-old is so hard on his clothes, so I've started mending the knees when he wears through them. I did something really similar except I put a really large patch on the inside so that it would cover not only the hole, but the entire thin spot, and used a thick navy perle cotton and a running stitch. I really like how it came out and so does he! I think he might have been a little TOO happy to tear the other knee so that they end up matching.

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  3. I really like the look - great idea!

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  4. This is just like I do visible mending only sometimes I put the patch underneath so that the raggedy bits show through the sashiko a bit. I love the “make do and mend” philosophy for sure!

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  5. I love this idea! I am learning sashiko and now it will come in handy in other ways!! Thanks for the examples - yours look great!

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  6. I have always mended my clothes and clothes for others. Most of it has been non-visible mending - a popped seam, fixing a hem, darning a hole in a sock.

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  7. I've always mended our clothes, but I do refuse to darn socks.

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  8. so cute, what kind of thread do you use here?

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  9. I have mended small holes on my husband's jeans and flannel shirts putting a stabilizing piece on the back and using a matching color thread zigzag stitch all over it...guess you would call that darning. I don't think he would care for me to do that kind of stitching on his jeans...but my jeans...oh yes!:)

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  10. Way back a long time ago. which I can say because I'm old, someone asked my Mom how she darned socks. Her answer was that she said Darn It and threw it away, I've always liked that. but I love your jeans, But truthfully, I have never worn out something that far. I think it goes to the Goodwill way before then!

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