Monday, October 8, 2018

indigo pouch


This weekend, as I was digging through my stash looking for just the right fabric for a simple pouch I wanted to make, I came across my stack of indigo dyed fabric that's been waiting to be used for almost 2 years! Crazy! I love the deep blue color of indigo and enjoy seeing all the beautiful patterns in my little stack very, very much. Every time I pull them out though I start thinking they need to become a quilt which then means I put them promptly back since I don't feel like making a quilt right at all.

So, I finally decided that instead of waiting for my quilting mojo to show up, I'll just be using these lovely prints to make smaller projects instead. 


And I made this quilted zipper pouch, of course.


I started out by basting a panel of fabric to cotton batting and quilting the two layers together. As you can see I only used a few pins to hold them together as I find small projects like this are easy to quilt without much basting.

I used Hera marker to ensure my lines will be nice and straight and quilted the panels about 1/2'' apart (I marked my lines 1'' apart, then added another line of stitching in between the marked ones).


I followed The Essential Pouch pattern (medium size) for this pouch but since I skipped adding a contrasting bottom I simply used cutting measurements for the lining to cut my exterior panels.


I used a beautiful striped linen/cotton blend print for the lining which makes for a wonderfully sturdy pouch. 

This was a quick, but very satisfying project and I highly recommend making a pouch (or two) when you feel like sewing but don't have much time to spare.

Wishing you all a happy and creative week. Svetlana


3 comments:

  1. So inspiring. Each one is one of a kind! I have several yards of indigo dyed fabric and just mastered the Essential pouch so I’ll be trying this soon. Thanks for your great tutorials!

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    Replies
    1. Yay! Looking forward to seeing your pouch :)

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  2. I see that you sew around the perimeter of your finished panels. Do you do this after you have cut your panels to size?

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